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Edmund Scambler
lithograph portrait of Edmund Scambler D.D. Bishop of Norwich 1584, etched by W.C. Edwards in 1844
"As if," says Gunton, "King Henry had not taken away enough, and the Bishop himself would take away more. That in the beginning of Elizabeth's reign, statutes were made disabling ecclesiastical proprietors from granting away their lands except on leases for three lives, or twenty-one years. Lord Keeper Puckering petitioned the Queen to confer the see of Ely on Scambler, when eighty-eight years old, in order that he might give him a lease of part of the lands. A.D. 1585‑1594. Edmund Scambler, translated from Peterborough.

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Edmund Scambler

From Wikipedia,

Edmund Scambler (c.15201594) was an English bishop.

Life

He was born at Gressingham, and was educated at Peterhouse, Cambridge, Queens' College, Cambridge and Jesus College, Cambridge, graduating B.A. in 1542.[1][2]

Under Mary I of England he was pastor to a covert Protestant congregation in London.[3] He was a chaplain to Archbishop Matthew Parker.[4]

He became Bishop of Peterborough in 1561, and was a reviser of the Bishops' Bible.[2][5] He suspended Eusebius Pagit, then vicar of Lamport, in 1574.[6]

In 1585 he became Bishop of Norwich. He was responsible there for the heresy proceedings against Francis Kett.[7]

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53271
  2. ^ a b Concise Dictionary of National Biography
  3. ^ Patrick Collinson, The Elizabethan Puritan Movement (1982), p. 61.
  4. ^ Dictionary of National Biography, article Parker, Matthew.

Edmund Scambler
lithograph portrait of Edmund Scambler D.D. Bishop of Norwich 1584, etched by W.C. Edwards in 1844
KILLM : 2000.172/1965.81
d Scambler had been chaplain to Archbishop Parker. During his long
p102episcopate at Peterborough, he alienated much of the land belonging to the see; "As if," says Gunton, "King Henry had not taken away enough, and the Bishop himself would take away more." The greater part of the alienated estates passed into the hands of Cecil, who surrounded his mansion-house at Burleigh with the spoils of the see of Peterborough. At the commencement of the Reformation, and during the reigns of Edward VI and Mary, the alienation of Church property had gone so far, "that in the beginning of Elizabeth's reign, statutes were made disabling ecclesiastical proprietors from granting away their lands except on leases for three lives, or twenty-one years. But an unfortunate reservation was made in favour of the crown. The Queen, therefore, and her courtiers, who obtained grants from her, continued to prey upon their succulent victim."1 Cecil, however, was not more "mercenary and rapacious" than the rest of Elizabeth's courtiers, with the exception of Walsingham, "who spent his own estate in her service, and left not sufficient to pay his debts." (See Ely, Part II, Bishop Cox.) The Bishop of Peterborough was not less active in the work of alienation after his translation to Norwich; and Lord Keeper Puckering petitioned the Queen to confer the see of Ely on Scambler, when eighty-eight years old, in order that he might give him a lease of part of the lands. This second translation never took place; and by an act in the first year of James I, conveyances of bishops' lands to the crown are made void: "a concession," says Hallam, "much to the King's honour." Norwich Cathedral

Part II. History of the See,
with Short Notices of the principal Bishops.

A.D. 1585‑1594. Edmund Scambler, translated from Peterborough. Bishop Scambler alienated much at Peterborough (see that Cathedral, Pt. II); and did the same at Norwich. His monument was destroyed by the Puritans.